Bryan awards Achievement Scholarships
March 07, 2012

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Bryan College has awarded its first Bryan Achievement Scholarships, a competitive grant given in addition to the top academic scholarships, Director of Admissions Aaron Porter has announced.
 
To be eligible for the Achievement Scholarships, students had to qualify for the Presidential Merit Scholarship, the Presidential Scholarship, or the Dean’s Scholarship, and participate in an interview with faculty during a weekend visit to campus.
 
Faculty committees reviewed the students’ records and interviewed them in an effort to determine how they might contribute to the Bryan community. “We were looking for which student had the potential to positively influence the social, leadership, academic, and spiritual aspects of the community,” Mr. Porter said. “We really appreciate the faculty’s help in this process.”
 
Fifty-one students participated in the first scholarship event in late February, and five were selected for the $1,000 renewable award which will be added to their scholarship. Students chosen include:
 
  • Natalie deMacedo, daughter of Vinnie and Jennifer deMacedo of Plymouth, Mass. Natalie, a student at New Testament Christian School, plans to major in English with secondary education licensure.
  • Meredith Kreigh, daughter of Nick and Julie Kriegh of Auburn, Ind. Meredith, a home school student, plans to major in Christian thought.
  • Michael Whitlock, son of Mark and Kaye Whitlock of Franklin, Tenn. Michael, a home school student, plans to major in communication studies: film and technology option.
  • Juliet Spiekermann, daughter of Luke and Tracy Spiekermann of Hixson, Tenn. Juliet is a student at Soddy-Daisy High School and plans to major in communication studies: film and technology option.
  • Isaac Geyman, son of Troy and Luann Geyman of Bonners Ferry, Idaho. Isaac, a home school student, plans to major in politics and government.
 
The college will sponsor a second interview event March 23 and 24 for prospective students, Mr. Porter said.