Bryan to co-sponsor trafficking conference
May 02, 2013

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The Georgia Department of Education and the Bryan College Center for International Development will present “Human Trafficking: Not Just a Global Problem,” at The Carter Center in Atlanta, Monday and Tuesday, May 13 and 14.
 
This conference is designed to train and support educators, anti-human trafficking organizations, social services agencies, and law enforcement officials on combating human trafficking. Speakers will include Christine Dolan and Maria Velikonja, who were keynote speakers at the March 2010 United Nations human trafficking conference in New York.
 
The conference will include presenters who focus on anti-human trafficking activities at a global, national, and local level. The Carter Center, which has focused its human trafficking work in the Democratic Republic of Congo, also will host ten vendors at the conference representing organizations involved in the fight against human trafficking.
 
The conference is designed to provide attendees with the tools they need to identify and help trafficking victims in their communities. Attendees will learn how to contact law enforcement and other agencies, as well as provide a comprehensive overview of trafficking. They will be introduced not only to the global problem of trafficking and the work of organizations like The Carter Center, but they also will hear about what’s happening locally and how they can help students who are victims and potential victims.
 
Approximately 18,000 persons are trafficked into the United States from over 50 countries every year. Over 300,000 children are trafficked within the United States annually. In Georgia alone, it is estimated that 400 to 500 individuals are trafficked each month.
 
Dennis Miller, Bryan College’s executive director of external relations, said among those planning to attend the conference are three persons working to establish an anti-human trafficking organization in the Washington, D.C., area.
 
“From the kinds of people contacting us over the past couple of years, it is evident that organizations and people in the anti-trafficking effort are beginning to see Bryan more and more as a major player in this fight,” he said.